Patrick Noonan

Patrick Noonan

Experience Architect

By applying his expertise in Information Architecture, Interaction Design, Usability Research and Experimental Psychology, Patrick Noonan has found a balance between academic theory and practical application. Patrick’s extensive academic background is a perfect compliment to his industry experience. Patrick has had the opportunity to consult on projects ranging from government websites, emergency response support tools, telecommunications applications (mobile, VOIP), e-commerce applications, mobile applications, and video games.

Mr. Noonan’s academic background along with his practical experience, natural leadership skills and outcome-oriented personality have resulted in a stellar reputation among his peers for producing the highest quality deliverables.

Author Archives: Patrick Noonan

IS RESPONSIVE DESIGN GREAT MOBILE DESIGN?

IS RESPONSIVE DESIGN GREAT MOBILE DESIGN?

The first time in your career that you notice things have changed since you started is a pretty exciting milestone.  In a young industry like UX, this doesn’t take long.  The biggest changes I have noticed have been in the mobile space.   Specifically, I can remember a time when designing mobile experiences meant only designingRead more

5 Things to Consider When Conducting Usability Testing on Mobile Devices

5 Things to Consider When Conducting Usability Testing on Mobile Devices

When it comes to repeatedly creating exceptional user experiences, there are few tools in the UX practitioner’s toolbox as critical as usability testing.  As mobile has become such a crucial domain for User Experience, mobile usability testing has played a critical role in shaping the usability of mobile experiences.   In this article I will discussRead more

3 Types of Interaction Consistency

3 Types of Interaction Consistency

Interaction consistency may be one of the most widely accepted pillars of usable interaction design. This seemingly simple concept can act as a double-edged sword and has lead many interface designers to make serious UX design errors in the name of consistency. Akendi’s 12 Interaction Design Principles, include 3 different types of interaction consistency: SystemRead more

LEAP Motion Controller – User Experience Review

LEAP Motion Controller – User Experience Review

If you’ve ever tried to pinch, squeeze, tap or swipe a non-touch screen, you already understand why the Leap Motion controller was created.   For only $80, this iPod Nano sized device promises to turn any screen into a multi-touch display.  Before its release, countless teaser videos emerged online showing users seamlessly interacting with the deviceRead more

Audio Interface Design: Why R2-D2 Couldn’t Talk

Audio Interface Design: Why R2-D2 Couldn’t Talk

Growing up an avid Star Wars fan, it was always my dream to have a robot like R2-D2.  In case you aren’t familiar, R2-D2 is the trashcan looking robot who is one of the main characters in the Star Wars trilogy (he’s in the new ones too, but I think it’s best for everyone thatRead more

Personas: What (or who) are they?

Personas: What (or who) are they?

(Click here to watch our video on User Groups & Personas.) In a number of projects, I’ve had the opportunity to dig deep into the concept of user personas and their application. User personas are generally considered a side dish in the otherwise usability testing and interaction design heavy menu of a user experience professional’sRead more

User-Centered Design Vs. User Designed: How to avoid building “The Homer”

User-Centered Design Vs. User Designed: How to avoid building “The Homer”

Like most people today, I learned most of what I know from television.  My first lesson in user research came in 1991 when I saw an episode of The Simpsons entitled, “Oh Brother Where Art Though’.   In case you don’t have that particular episode etched into your brain like I do, the basic premise isRead more

Intuitive: A word that isn’t that intuitive

Intuitive: A word that isn’t that intuitive

I recently had a conversation with a client where the topic of drag-and-drop was brought up.  They had been using drag-and-drop in one of their products because they considered it an intuitive way for their customers to interact with their software.  Through the conversation I realized we had stumbled on some common misconceptions around whatRead more